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There is more to a job than just the pay. The type of work you do and the people you work with have a lot to do with a sense of satisfaction. Consequently, job satisfaction has been measured extensively for decades in many industries. To gauge how satisfied UX practitioners are with their jobs, the UXPA has been asking respondents a job satisfaction question since

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The PURE (Practical Usability Rating by Experts) method is an analytic technique that identifies potential problems users may encounter with an interface. In a PURE evaluation, evaluators familiar with UX principles and heuristics break down tasks into small steps. They then rate each step, from 1 to 3, based on a pre-defined rubric. The higher the score, the more difficult the experience. As we continue to

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Each year we lend our analytical skills to the UXPA to help the UX community understand the latest compensation, skills, and composition of the UX profession. We helped collect, analyze, and interpret the salary and related skills of UX professionals from around the world. The details are available on the UXPA website. Here are the highlights and the calculator. Survey Results The data was collected

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Being sure there’s enough money in your checking account to pay bills is stressful enough. The complexity of your banking website shouldn’t add to that stress. To compete for your business and reduce the cost of maintaining physical branches and staff, banks continue to offer more online features and improve the experiences on desktop and mobile. To understand the current state of the banking user

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The System Usability Scale (SUS) is a popular measure of perceived usability. It's a 10-item questionnaire scored on a 101-point scale and provides a measure of a user’s perception of the usability of a “system.” A system can be just about anything a human interacts with: software apps (business and consumer), hardware, mobile devices, mobile apps, websites, or voice user interfaces. By itself though, the

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The Net Promoter Score (NPS) is widely used. But it’s not necessarily widely loved. Some people are quite critical of the Net Promoter Score. Jared Spool wrote a strong critique of the NPS  and Gerry McGovern largely agreed. When I followed up with Jared about his thoughts, he felt that “UX researchers should not use the NPS or, if that’s not an option, ignore it.”

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When done well, surveys are an excellent method for collecting data quickly from a geographically diverse population of users, customers, or prospects. In an earlier article, I described 15 types of the most common rating scale items and when you might use them. While rating scales are an important part of a survey, they aren’t the only part. Another key ingredient to a successful survey

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What forms do I need to file my taxes this year? How much is a National Park Pass? How do I renew my passport? Federal government websites are helpful for a wide variety of activities, from mailing a package to booking a camping site to filing taxes. Many federal branches have begun to computerize their services to streamline these tasks. But with the proliferation of

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In an earlier article, I described the PURE methodology. PURE stands for Practical Usability Rating by Experts. Evaluators familiar with UX principles and heuristics decompose tasks into small steps and rate each step based on a pre-defined scoring system (called a rubric), as shown in Figure 1. [table id=30 /] Figure 1: Scoring rubric for PURE. The PURE method is analytic. It’s not based on

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It seems like there are endless ways to ask questions of participants in surveys. Variety in question types can be both a blessing and a curse. Having many ways to ask questions provides better options to the researcher to assess the opinion of the respondent. But the wrong type of question can fail to capture what’s intended, confuse respondents, or even lead to incorrect decisions.

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