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User and customer research fundamentally rely on collecting data from users and customers. But it can be a constant challenge to find the right number and type of qualified participants . Even when you find the right participants, there’s a limit to how much time they’re willing to spend filling out a survey. A common question we get from clients is how long is too

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Visualizing data can make digesting numbers easier and ideally lead to more efficient and accurate decisions. Graphs and visualizations aren’t without their risks, though. The choice of scales, graph types, and styles can all have an effect, for better or worse, on how your audience interprets the findings. Here are 10 best practices (and what to watch for) that we’ve compiled from our own experiences

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Online panels are a major source of participants for both market research and UX research studies. In an earlier article I summarized some of the research on the accuracy and variability of estimates from online panels. The types of estimates from those studies tended to center around general demographic or psychographic questions (e.g., smoking, newspaper readership). To understand whether similar findings would hold for UX-related

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Content is king. Whether it’s for books, movies, audio books, news sites, or entertainment websites. When you have good content people will come and stay. But if people can’t find the content or there’s too much friction in the experience you’ll likely lose your audience even with killer content. An increasing number of consumers now subscribe to a premium content service like Netflix, Hulu, or

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Online panel research has been a boon for market research and UX researchers alike. Since the late 1990s in fact, online panels have provided a cost effective pool of sample participants ready to take online studies, covering topics from soup to nuts (literally)…from apple juice to zippers. But can you trust the data you get from these online participants? In this article, I'll examine the

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Facilitation is a valuable skill for measuring the user experience. A good facilitator ensures sessions run smoothly, make participants comfortable, and extract the right data for even the most difficult scenarios, stakeholders, or participants. Joe Dumas and Beth Loring wrote a great guidebook that is an essential read for anyone interested in facilitating a usability session. Even though it's almost a decade old, it's still

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Having participants think aloud is a valuable tool used in UX research. It's primarily used to understand participants' mental processes, which can ultimately uncover problems with an interface. It has a rich history in the behavioral sciences that dates back over a century. Despite its value, it's not without its controversy. Some research has shown that depending on the activity, having participants think aloud can

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It was another busy year on MeasuringU.com with 50 new articles, the release of the 2nd editions of two books, UX Bootcamps in Denver and Rome and talks in London and Chicago. In 2016, our articles were served up to over a million visitors. Thank You! We covered topics including: usability testing, measurement and research methods, statistics, best practices with surveys, data analysis and visualizations.

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The best-laid plans of researchers often go awry. No matter how carefully a research project is planned, things may still go wrong.There are many threats to the success of a customer research project. At both big and small companies, at agencies and on the client side, research projects can fail to live up to expectations. Common problems include:Time delaysCost overrunsPoor managementTechnology problemsInsufficient sample sizesInadequate control

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Eye-tracking is a method that gets a lot of attention. Couple fancy (and expensive) equipment with a method that feels like peering into a customer's thought process and you'll get interest. Eye-tracking is perceived as something akin to a lie detector mixed with an MRI. After all, the eyes don't lie! But eye-tracking is not a panacea. Like many UX methods, it can be misused

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