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Do Users Read License Agreements?

The short answer is no. Whether free or paid, use software, and you have to agree to pages of legalese. So-called End User License Agreements or “EULAs” are ubiquitous. They are so common, in software and on the web, that many users ignore them and blindly click “Agree” without understanding what they’re agreeing to. While

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Measuring Task Times Without Users

A key aspect of usability is efficiency. Users should be able to complete tasks quickly. Efficiency is usually measured as time on task, one of the quintessential usability metrics. For transactional tasks done repeatedly, shaving a couple seconds off a time can mean saving minutes per day and hours per week for users (think Accounting,

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Top 10 Research-Based Usability Findings of 2010

5 Second Usability Tests: Ratings of website usability after only 5 seconds are the same as those after 10 minutes. Unmoderated Usability Data is Mostly Reliable: Data from remote usability test takers is rather similar to lab based studies except for task-times which differ more substantially. Cheaters: Around 10% of paid usability testers will cheat

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25 Resources For Measuring Usability

Books Measuring the User Experience by Tom Tullis & Bill Albert Beyond the Usability Lab by Bill Albert, Tom Tullis & Donna Tedesco Practical Guide to Usability Testing by Joe Dumas & Ginny Redish Usability Engineering by Jakob Nielsen Practical Guide to Measuring Usability (also available electronically) by Jeff Sauro Handbook of Usability Testing by

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Top-Box Scoring of Rating Scale Data

Rating scales are used widely. Ways of interpreting rating scale results also vary widely. What exactly does a 4.1 on a 5 point scale mean? In the absence of any benchmark or historical data, researchers and managers look at so-called top-box and top-two-box scores (boxes refer to the response options). For example, on a five-point

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How Many People Cheat In Online Surveys?

Remote user research has increased the demands for people willing to take surveys, provide website feedback and participate in usability tests. In exchange for their time, users are compensated. One drawback to these professional users is that there are some who are in it just for the money. Consequently, they may not take your study

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What Happens To Task-Ratings When You Interrupt Users?

In usability testing we ask users to complete tasks and often ask them to rate how difficult or easy the task was. Does it matter when you ask this question? What happens if we interrupt users during the task instead of asking it after the task experience is over? Almost ten years ago researchers at

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What Metrics Are Collected In Usability Tests?

There are many helpful books on usability testing. It is also helpful to know what actually happens in usability tests, including what metrics people collect. I asked MeasuringU newsletter subscribers to answer a few questions about how they measure usability. Sign up for weekly updates at the bottom of this page. In addition to the

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Were most Software Millionaires born around 1955?

If you’ve read a book by Malcolm Gladwell then you know how he has a knack for making the mundane meaningful through drama-filled story telling. In his book, Outliers, he makes a convincing case that birthday matters for success in hockey. Being born as close to the year-end cut-off provides a developmental advantage. According to

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5 Second Usability Tests

In a few seconds what can you tell about people… or websites? Some famous research has shown that student evaluations given after only a few seconds of video[pdf]are indistinguishable from evaluations from students who actually had the professor for an entire semester! There has been some relevant research on the importance of immediate website actions

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How Many Users Do People Actually Test?

If you’re familiar with usability testing then you’re familiar with the magic number 5. Five users will on average find most of the problems that affect at least one-third or more of your users. If problems are less common, then you will need to test more users to find and fix them. On many high-traffic

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