Blogs

When done well, surveys are an excellent method for collecting data quickly from a geographically diverse population of users, customers, or prospects. In an earlier article, I described 15 types of the most common rating scale items and when you might use them. While rating scales are an important part of a survey, they aren’t the only part. Another key ingredient to a successful survey

Read More

What forms do I need to file my taxes this year? How much is a National Park Pass? How do I renew my passport? Federal government websites are helpful for a wide variety of activities, from mailing a package to booking a camping site to filing taxes. Many federal branches have begun to computerize their services to streamline these tasks. But with the proliferation of

Read More

In an earlier article, I described the PURE methodology. PURE stands for Practical Usability Rating by Experts. Evaluators familiar with UX principles and heuristics decompose tasks into small steps and rate each step based on a pre-defined scoring system (called a rubric), as shown in Figure 1. [table id=30 /] Figure 1: Scoring rubric for PURE. The PURE method is analytic. It’s not based on

Read More

It seems like there are endless ways to ask questions of participants in surveys. Variety in question types can be both a blessing and a curse. Having many ways to ask questions provides better options to the researcher to assess the opinion of the respondent. But the wrong type of question can fail to capture what’s intended, confuse respondents, or even lead to incorrect decisions.

Read More

A benchmark study tells you where a website, app, or product falls relative to some meaningful comparison. This comparison can be to an earlier version, the competition, or industry standard. Benchmark studies are often called summative evaluations as the emphasis is less on finding problems and more on quantitatively assessing the current experience. To quantify, you need metrics and UX benchmark studies can have quite

Read More

Mobile technology continues to evolve at a rapid pace. To help keep up, we pulled together relevant insights about the mobile user experience and mobile usage in general. This is an updated article to the 2017, 2016, 2015, and 2013 articles based on published data and our own mobile UX research. Cellphones are ubiquitous. A Pew Research report suggests that 95% of Americans own a cellphone; around

Read More

Usability testing is expensive. At least that has been the perception. But the idea that usability is a nice-to-have ideal that only big companies such as IBM or Microsoft can afford has fortunately evolved. While technology has improved and gotten cheaper, it’s the technique that’s become more accessible and accepted. The discount-usability movement helped emphasize the effectiveness of low-cost, smaller sample sizes to find and fix usability

Read More

The System Usability Scale has been around for decades and is used by hundreds of organizations globally. The 10-item SUS questionnaire is a measure of a user’s perception of the usability of a “system.” A system can be just about anything a human interacts with: software apps (business and consumer), hardware, mobile devices, mobile apps, websites, or voice user interfaces. The SUS questionnaire is scored

Read More

What are the admission requirements? What courses are available this semester? How much exactly does it cost to attend? Where do I park for the football game? University websites are the information hubs for prospective and current students, parents, and faculty, who usually come to the site with a specific goal in mind. With such diverse audiences, these websites need to be accessible enough for

Read More