Blogs

Many software companies track and use the Net Promoter Score as a gauge of customer loyalty. Positive word of mouth is a critical driver of future growth. If you have a usable product, customers will tell their friends about the positive experience. And alternatively, a poor user experience will lead customers to tell their friends how unusable a product is. But what are good Net

Read More

It's fine to compute means and statistically analyze ordinal data from rating scales. But just because one rating is twice as high as another does not mean users are really twice as satisfied. When we use rating scales in surveys, we're translating intangible fuzzy attitudes about a topic into specific quantities. Overall, how satisfied are you with your cell-phone service? Very Unsatisfied 1 2 3

Read More

When we look to improve the user experience of software or websites, sometimes the best improvements aren't slight tweaks to the interface but involve eliminating steps altogether. Here are four examples from the physical world that may inspire improvements in the digital world followed by four experiences that can use some refining. Four Terrific User Experiences Keyless entry: We get in and out of our

Read More

It is one of the most important questions to ask when measuring usability. Just how much does the process of measuring impact the metrics we collect? In measuring perceived usability of five popular websites, I found that a single difficult task lowered post-test usability scores by 8%. This was largely driven by users with the least experience with the website, whose scores dropped by almost

Read More

Closed ended rating scale data is easy to summarize and hard to interpret. Ideally you can compare the responses to an industry benchmark, a competitor or even a similar survey question from a prior survey. In most cases this data doesn't exist, it's too expensive or too difficult to obtain. This leaves product managers and researchers to do their best in interpreting the raw responses.

Read More

It's easy to get derailed when writing a survey or questionnaire. On top of worrying what to ask and who to ask, you have to worry about how to ask the questions so you don't distort the real views of the respondents. Here are eight things to help make the process a little smoother: Use all positive wording: People respond differently to positively worded and

Read More

There is a long tradition of including items in questionnaires that are phrased both positively and negatively. This website was easy to use. It was difficult to find what I needed on this website. The major reason for alternating item wording is to minimize extreme response bias and acquiescent bias. However, some recent research[pdf] Jim Lewis and I conducted found little evidence for these biases.

Read More

Few things tend to generate more heated debate than the format of response options used in surveys. Right in the middle of that debate is whether the number of options should be odd or even. Odd numbered response scales include a neutral response whereas even ones do not. Research generally shows that including a neutral response will affect the distribution of responses and sometimes lead

Read More

Why spend more time completing a task when it could be done in less time? Users become very cognizant of inefficient interactions and this is especially the case with tasks that are repeated often. Task time is the best way to measure the efficiency of a task and it is a metric that everyone understands. Task Time Logistics The familiarity of the task time metric

Read More

It's good to think positively, but sometimes, negative thinking can solve problems more effectively. There's no shortage of problems on websites and software. Many of them are interaction problems. Users can't login Visitors can't find the products in the navigation Customers are calling support Sales are low Conversion rate are down Fixing Symptoms not Problems We've all had the experience of fixing the same problem

Read More