Simplifying the UMUX-Lite

It seems like every few years a new standardized UX measure comes along. Standardization of UX measurement is a good thing for researchers and practitioners. Having common methods and definitions helps with objectivity, generalization, economy, and professional communication. At MeasuringU, we pay a lot of attention to the continuing evolution of standardized UX measurement. The

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What Do You Gain from Larger-Sample Usability Tests?

We typically recommend small sample sizes (5–10) for conducting iterative usability testing meant to find and fix problems (formative evaluations). For benchmark or comparative studies, where the focus is on detecting differences or estimating population parameters (summative evaluations), we recommend using larger sample sizes (20–100+). Usability testing can be used to uncover problems and assess the

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Are Sliders Better Than Numbered Scales?

There are many ways to format rating scales. Recently we have explored Labeling neutral points Labeling all or some response options Altering the number of response options Comparing agreement vs. item-specific endpoint labels Each of these formatting decisions has a variety of opinions and research, both pro and con, in the scientific literature at large.

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Three Questionnaires for Measuring Voice Interaction Experiences

Human: Computer, can you recognize speech? Computer: I think you said, can you wreck a nice beach? Both the quality of synthesized speech and the capability of communicating with a computer using your voice have come a long way since the debut of this technology in the 1970s. One of the most famous synthetic voices

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8 Manipulations of the Net Promoter Score: Which Ones Matter?

There’s no shortage of opinions about the Net Promoter Score. There’s nothing wrong with an opinion. It’s just better when there’s data backing it. Unfortunately, when it comes to opinions about the Net Promoter Score, especially how the underlying question is displayed, the opinions are often based on anecdotes and out-of-context “best practices.” At MeasuringU,

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10 Things to Know about the Microsoft Desirability Toolkit

Who, as a person, doesn’t want to be desirable? And if you’re in the business of developing products or services, who doesn’t want those to be desirable? There is a deep satisfaction beyond the monetary rewards of providing something that people want (and of course, the money’s nice, too). While we’ve found wide interest in

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Three Branches of Standardized UX Measurement

We write extensively about standardized UX metrics such as the SUS, PSSUQ, and SUPR-Q. The main benefits of standardization include improved reliability, validity, sensitivity, objectivity, quantification, economy, communication, and norms. Even when standardized UX questionnaires are developed independently, they are influenced by earlier work, just like how UX itself is a new field built upon earlier

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Will You Recommend or Would You Recommend?

Small changes can have big impacts on rating scales. But to really know what the effects are, you need to test. Labels, number of points, colors, and item wording differences can often have unexpected effects on survey responses. In an earlier analysis, we compared the effects of using a three-point recommend item compared to an

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Does Coloring Response Categories Affect Responses?

Survey response options come in all sorts of shapes, sizes, and now, colors. The number of points, the addition of labels, the use of numbers, and the use of positive or negative tone are all factors that can be manipulated. These changes can also affect responses, sometimes modestly, sometimes a lot. There is some concern

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10 Things to Know about the Microsoft NSAT Score

We love writing about measures at MeasuringU. We write about measures we’ve created (SUPR-Q), industry standards (SUS, NPS, and TAM), emerging industry standards (UMUX-Lite), and lesser-known ones (lostness). Jim Lewis and I also have a chapter dedicated to questionnaires in Quantifying the User Experience. We’ll often encounter a new measure when working with clients, as

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