How to Assess the Quality of a Measure

It seems like each year introduces a new measure or questionnaire. Like a late-night infomercial, some are even touted as the next BIG thing, like the NPS was. New questionnaires and measures are a natural part of the evolution of measurement (especially measuring difficult things such as human attitudes). It’s a good thing. I’ll often

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Practical Tips for Running a PURE Evaluation

In an earlier article, I described the PURE methodology. PURE stands for Practical Usability Rating by Experts. Evaluators familiar with UX principles and heuristics decompose tasks into small steps and rate each step based on a pre-defined scoring system (called a rubric), as shown in Figure 1. Figure 1: Scoring rubric for PURE. The PURE

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15 Common Rating Scales Explained

It seems like there are endless ways to ask questions of participants in surveys. Variety in question types can be both a blessing and a curse. Having many ways to ask questions provides better options to the researcher to assess the opinion of the respondent. But the wrong type of question can fail to capture

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Are Top Box Scores a Better Predictive of Behavior

Are Top Box Scores a Better Predictor of Behavior?

What does 4.1 on a 5-point scale mean? Or 5.6 on a 7-point scale? Interpreting rating scale data can be difficult in the absence of an external benchmark or historical norms. A popular technique used often by marketers to interpret rating scale data is the so-called “top box” and “top-two box” scoring services. For example, on

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Reducing the Noise in Your Net Promoter Analysis

A good measure of customer loyalty should be valid, reliable, and sensitive to changes in customer attitudes. For the most part, the Net Promoter Score achieves this (although it does have its drawbacks). One area the Net Promoter Score lacks in is how its scoring services adds “noise” to the customer loyalty signal. The process

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5 Things to Know about Likert Scales

You’ve seen them. You’ve answered them. It seems like everyone has an opinion about them. Here are five things to know about the famous Likert scale. (One for each response option!) The Likert scale was developed and named after psychologist Rensis Likert. The now ubiquitous Likert scale consists of multiple items. Participants are asked to

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Getting to Know Your Data Types

Know your data. When measuring the customer experience, one of the first things you need to understand is how to identify and categorize the data you come across. It’s one of the first things covered in our UX Boot Camp and it’s something I cover in Chapter 2 of Customer Analytics for Dummies. Early consideration

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10 Things To Know About The Single Ease Question (SEQ)

The Single Ease Question (SEQ) is a 7-point rating scale to assess how difficult users find a task. It’s administered immediately after a user attempts a task in a usability test. After users attempt a task, ask them this simple question: Overall, how difficult or easy was the task to complete? Use the seven point

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Are Men Overconfident Users?

There are some interesting known differences between men and women in the psychological literature. For example, women tend to be better judges of emotion when looking at faces for just 0.2 of a second[pdf]! And across many measures of ability, while both men and women tend to exhibit overconfidence, men are generally more overconfident than

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The Essential Elements of a Successful Website

What makes a successful website? There are some obvious metrics like revenue, traffic and repeat visitors. But these are outcome measures. They don’t tell you why revenue or traffic is higher or lower.  Key drivers of these outcomes are how the users perceive and interact with your website. Selling a product that has demand or

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