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Sample Sizes for Comparing Dependent Proportions

Sample size estimation is an important part of study planning. If the sample size is too small, the study will be underpowered, meaning it will be incapable of detecting sufficiently small differences as statistically significant. If the sample size is too large, the study will be inefficient and cost more than necessary. A critical component

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Is What You See What You Get?
Examining the Evaluator Effect in Unmoderated Usability Testing

If different researchers conduct a study, will they identify different problems? While it was originally controversial, the evaluator effect is now well-established in the field of UX research. The evaluator effect is the finding that, in general, different teams or individuals conducting a usability study will identify and report different problems (Hertzum & Jacobsen, 2003).

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microphone in front of laptop with recording software open on laptop screen, foreground text reads: Does Thinking Aloud Affect Study Metrics?

Does Thinking Aloud Affect Study Metrics?

One of the most popular UX research methods is Think Aloud (TA) usability testing. Having participants speak their thoughts while working on tasks helps researchers identify usability problems and potential fixes. After a TA session, many UX research teams also collect study-level metrics. Study-level metrics are typically asked only once in a study (unlike task-level

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Does Thinking Aloud Affect Task Metrics?

One of the most popular UX research methods is Think Aloud (TA) usability testing. Having participants speak their thoughts while working on tasks helps researchers identify usability problems and potential fixes. But does the added burden of speaking while attempting a task make the experience harder and affect perceptions of the website or app being

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Does Thinking Aloud Increase Task Time?

One of the most popular UX research methods is Think Aloud (TA) usability testing. Having participants speak their thoughts while working on tasks helps researchers identify usability problems and potential fixes. While the method has been around for decades with the use of an attending moderator, more recent technological advancements in the past 15 years

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What Percentage of Participants Think Aloud?

What percentage of users are willing to participate in a TA study? The Think Aloud (TA) method, in which participants speak their thoughts as they attempt to complete tasks, is one of the most distinctive characteristics of usability testing. Think Aloud, as a method for understanding human attitudes and behavior, has been around for over

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A Taxonomy of Common UX Research Methods

User experience research has a wide variety of methods. From one perspective, it’s good because there’s usually a method for whatever research question you need to answer. On the other hand, it’s hard to keep track of all these methods. Some methods, such as usability testing, are commonly used and have been around for decades.

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Does Thinking Aloud Increase Study Dropout Rates?

The Think Aloud (TA) method is one of the most distinguishing characteristics of usability testing. The method involves having participants speak their thoughts as they attempt tasks on an interface. Think Aloud as a method for understanding human attitudes and behavior has been around for over a century. While we often think of the Think

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The Many Ways of Thinking Aloud

The Think Aloud method (TA) is one of the most distinguishing characteristics of usability testing. The method involves having participants speak their thoughts as they attempt tasks on an interface. We often think of the TA method as a single method, but there are substantial variations in how it’s implemented. In an earlier article, we

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A Guide to Task-Based UX Metrics

When quantifying the user experience of a product, app, or experience, we recommend using a mix of study-level and task-based UX metrics. While it’s not always feasible to assess a task experience (because of challenges with budgets, timelines, or access to products and users), observing participants attempt tasks can help uncover usability problems, informing designers

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