How and When to Use an Affinity Diagram

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][vc_column_text]The affinity diagram is a visual technique to organize ideas and information. The “affinity” between pieces of information reveals patterns and often a hierarchy that can help with product design (similar to the affinity or basket analysis). It’s also known as the K-J method for its creator, Jiro Kawakita, who developed it as one of

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4 Things UX Research Tells You that Google Analytics Doesn’t

Google Analytics is an amazing tool for understanding website traffic. There’s a reason most of the top websites use it. Among other things it can tell you: – How many people visit daily, monthly, and across years and seasons – How much time people spend on pages – What pages get the most visitors –

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Top 10 UX Metrics, Methods & Measurement Articles from 2015

It was another busy year on MeasuringU.com with 49 new articles, a new book and UX Bootcamp. In 2015, our articles were served up 2.3 million times to 900,000 visitors. Thank You! We covered topics including the essentials of usability testing, finding the right sample size, and better ways of measuring the customer experience. Here,

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Using Surveys to Measure the User Experience

The best way to measure the user experience is by observing real users attempting realistic tasks.   This is best done through a usability test or direct observation of users. You may not always be able to do so though because of limitations in time, costs, availability of products, or difficulty in finding qualified users. Many large

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Assessing the Validity of Your Research

You often hear that research results are not “valid” or “reliable.” Like many scientific terms that have made it into our vernacular, these terms are often used interchangeably. In fact, validity and reliability have different meanings with different implications for researchers. Validity refers to how well the results of a study measure what they are

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4 Experiment Types for User Research

Which design will improve the user experience? One of the primary goals of conducting user research is to establish some causal relationship between a design and a behavior. Typically, we want to see if a design element or changes to an interface lead to a more usable experience (experiment) or if more desirable outcomes are

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Seven Ways to Test the Effectiveness of Icons

For as long as user interfaces have had icons, there have been strong opinions about what makes an effective icon. From the business analyst to the CEO, we all like to tell the designer what’s “intuitive” and what’s “terrible.” Instead of making decisions based on the pay grade of the people in a meeting, consider

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Five User Research Mistakes To Avoid

There are a lot of mistakes that can be made when conducting any type of research. But almost all research contains some mistakes in methodology, measurement or interpretation. Rarely do the mistakes render the research useless. To help make your next user research endeavor more useful, here are five common mistakes to avoid. 1. Usability

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The Value of Measuring Poor User Experiences

When we have a good experience with a service or product, we enjoy it, tell our friends, and will probably use that service or product again. But when we have a frustrating or poor experience, such as the occurrence of message boxes relentlessly popping up during sporting events, we hate the product, tell our friends

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