Six Ways to Improve Participant Recall

How much did you spend last month on clothing? What grocery stores have you visited in the last three months? How helpful are your Netflix recommendations? Surveys and other research methods (such as in-depth interviewing) often rely on participants recalling prior events or behaviors. For example, these could be about purchasing a product or service

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How to Write a Survey Question

A blank page can lead to writer’s block. Writing survey questions can also seem like trying to write the Great American Novel. It can be particularly daunting knowing that subtle word changes may lead to unanticipated responses. The good news is that you don’t have to start from scratch each time. Instead, you can follow

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The UMUX-Lite Usefulness Item: Assessing a “Useful” Alternate

When Kraig Finstad (2010) developed the Usability Metric for User Experience (UMUX), his goal was to replace the ten-item System Usability Scale (SUS, a popular measure of perceived usability) with a shorter questionnaire that would (1) correlate highly with the SUS and (2) have item content related to the ISO 9241 Part 11 international standard,

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“Does What I Need It to Do”: Assessing an Alternate Usefulness Item

The UMUX-Lite is a two-item standardized questionnaire that, since its publication in 2013, has been adopted more and more by researchers who need a concise UX metric. Figure 1 shows the standard version with its Perceived Ease-of-Use (“{Product} is easy to use”) and Perceived Usefulness (“{Product}’s capabilities meet my requirements”) items.   Figure 1: Standard

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Exploring Another Alternate Form for the UMUX-Lite Usefulness Item

When thinking about user experiences with websites or software, what is the difference between capabilities and functions? Is there any difference at all? In software engineering, a function is code that takes inputs, processes them, and produces outputs (such as a math function). The word capability doesn’t have a formal definition, but it most often

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UMUX Lite easier

From Functionality to Features: Making the UMUX-Lite Even Simpler

Like pictures and pixels on a screen, words are a type of user interface. Complex language, like complex software, can lead to misunderstanding, so words should communicate effectively while being easy to understand. The solution, to paraphrase William Zinsser, is to use words that are simple and concise—a guideline that also applies to UX questionnaires.

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Simplifying the UMUX-Lite

It seems like every few years a new standardized UX measure comes along. Standardization of UX measurement is a good thing for researchers and practitioners. Having common methods and definitions helps with objectivity, generalization, economy, and professional communication. At MeasuringU, we pay a lot of attention to the continuing evolution of standardized UX measurement. The

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Three Questionnaires for Measuring Voice Interaction Experiences

Human: Computer, can you recognize speech? Computer: I think you said, can you wreck a nice beach? Both the quality of synthesized speech and the capability of communicating with a computer using your voice have come a long way since the debut of this technology in the 1970s. One of the most famous synthetic voices

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Using Task Ease (SEQ) to Predict Completion Rates and Times

Our attitudes both reflect and affect our actions. What we think affects what we do and what we do affects what we think. It’s not a perfect relationship of course. What people say or think doesn’t always directly correspond to actions in easily predictable ways. Understanding and measuring user attitudes early and often can provide

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How to Know Which Items to Remove in a Questionnaire

Surveys often suffer from having too many questions. Many items are redundant or don’t measure what they intend to measure. Even worse, survey items are often the result of “design by committee” with more items getting added over time to address someone’s concerns. Let’s say an organization uses the following items in a customer survey:

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