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The System Usability Scale (SUS) is the most used questionnaire to measure perceptions of usability. It was developed 30 years ago by John Brooke. I had the fortune to meet with John in person last month in London. We talked about his motivation and process for creating the now famous "quick and dirty" questionnaire. John wanted more than a list of issues from the usability

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The System Usability Scale (SUS) is a ten-item questionnaire administered to users for measuring the perceived ease of use of software, hardware, cell phones and websites. It's been around for more than a quarter century, and its wide usage has allowed us to study it extensively and write about it in this blog and in the book, A Practical Guide to the System Usability Scale.

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Usability is attitude plus action. Attitudes and actions are measured during a usability test where a representative sample of users are asked to complete tasks. During the test we collect task-based metrics of performance (completion rates, task-time and errors) and perception (task-level difficulty). We created the Single Usability Metric (SUM) to summarize these task metrics for company dashboards and to track improvements over time. At

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Introduced in 2003 by Fred Reichheld, the Net Promoter Score (NPS)® has become a popular metric of customer loyalty in industry. The NPS uses a single Likelihood to Recommend question ("How likely is it that you would recommend our company to a friend or colleague?") with 11 scale steps from 0 (Not at all likely) to 10 (Extremely likely), as shown below. In NPS terminology,

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Many software companies track and use the Net Promoter Score as a gauge of customer loyalty. Positive word of mouth is a critical driver of future growth. If you have a usable product, customers will tell their friends about the positive experience. And alternatively, a poor user experience will lead customers to tell their friends how unusable a product is. But what are good Net

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It is one of the most important questions to ask when measuring usability. Just how much does the process of measuring impact the metrics we collect? In measuring perceived usability of five popular websites, I found that a single difficult task lowered post-test usability scores by 8%. This was largely driven by users with the least experience with the website, whose scores dropped by almost

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There is a long tradition of including items in questionnaires that are phrased both positively and negatively. This website was easy to use. It was difficult to find what I needed on this website. The major reason for alternating item wording is to minimize extreme response bias and acquiescent bias. However, some recent research[pdf] Jim Lewis and I conducted found little evidence for these biases.

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It is the 25th anniversary of the creation of the most used questionnaire for measuring perceptions of usability. The System Usability Scale (SUS) was released into this world by John Brooke in 1986. It was originally created as a "quick and dirty" scale for administering after usability tests on systems like VT100 Terminal ("Green-Screen") applications. SUS is technology independent and has since been tested on

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In a few seconds what can you tell about people… or websites? Some famous research has shown that student evaluations given after only a few seconds of video[pdf]are indistinguishable from evaluations from students who actually had the professor for an entire semester! There has been some relevant research on the importance of immediate website actions and impressions: Visual Appeal: Impressions of a homepage's visual appeal

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The System Usability Scale (SUS) is the most popular standardized usability questionnaire. SUS was developed about 20 years ago at Digital Equipment Corporation by John Brooke. It's popular for two reasons: it's free and short (at only 10 questions). The process of taking a set of ordinary questions and making it into a psychometrically valid and reliable "standardized" questionnaire essentially involves having many users answer

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