Usability Testing

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Usability testing is expensive. At least that has been the perception. But the idea that usability is a nice-to-have ideal that only big companies such as IBM or Microsoft can afford has fortunately evolved. While technology has improved and gotten cheaper, it’s the technique that’s become more accessible and accepted. The discount-usability movement helped emphasize the effectiveness of low-cost, smaller sample sizes to find and fix usability

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Usability tests don’t have to be expensive or require a lot of technology. The real value is not in the equipment or technology but in the technique. Usability testing is not a focus group. Nor is usability testing a product demo. You shouldn’t lead participants through a product as if it were a demo and ask them if they “like” something. Uncovering problems users encounter

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You don’t need a dedicated usability lab to conduct a usability test. But if you or your organization conducts more than the occasional usability test, which it probably should (another topic in itself), you may want to consider setting up a dedicated usability lab. Having a dedicated space for testing is a hallmark of organizations with high UX maturity. Organizations rated as mature in UX

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Uncovering usability problems is at the heart of usability testing. Problems and insights can be uncovered from observing participants live in a usability lab, using heuristic evaluations, or watching videos of participants. But if you change the person looking for the problems (the evaluator), do you get a different set of problems? The Evaluator Effect It’s been 20 years since two influential papers (Jacobsen, Hertzum,

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Finding and fixing problems encountered by participants through usability testing generally leads to a better user experience. But not all participants are created equal. One of the major differentiating characteristics is prior experience. People with more experience tend to perform more tasks successfully, more quickly and generally have a more positive attitude about the experience than inexperienced people. But does testing with experienced users lead to uncovering

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While UX research may be a priority for you, it probably isn’t for your participants. And participants are a pretty important ingredient in usability testing. If people were predictable, reliable, and always did what they said, few of us would make a living in improving the user experience! Unfortunately, people don’t always show up when they say they will for your usability test, in-depth interview,

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Many researchers are familiar with the Hawthorne Effect in which people act differently when observed. It was named when researchers found workers at the Hawthorne Works factory performed better not because of increased lighting but because they were being watched. This observer effect happens not only with people but also with particles. In physics, the mere act of observing a phenomenon (like subatomic particle movement)

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Facilitating a usability test is a skill. With enough of the right practice you’ll get better at facilitating and running more effective usability test sessions. A solid foundation in both the theory and practical applications of facilitating a usability test will aid you in becoming a solid facilitator. To help, here are ten resources for both beginners and intermediate usability test facilitators. 1. Read about

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One of the fundamental principles behind usability testing is to let the participants actually use the software, app, or website and see what problems might emerge. By simulating use and not interrupting participants, you can detect and fix problems before users encounter them, get frustrated, and stop using and recommending your product. So while there’s good reason to shut up and watch users, should a

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The fundamental idea behind usability testing is that the interface creator is not the user. We can broaden the idea of an interface to encompass more than websites and software as Don Norman famously illustrated in his book The Design of Everyday Things. An interface is the point where people and systems interact. An interface can be words, images, light switches, door handles,  or complex

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