Quant or Qual Research? 27 Words to Help You Decide

When approaching a UX research project, one of the first things to consider is the method. And UX research has many methods. Methods can be categorized as quantitatively focused (e.g., A/B tests) or qualitatively focused (e.g., interviews). Most UX research methods can collect both qualitative and quantitative data. For example, surveys often collect both closed-ended

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Seven Reasons Survey Questions Are Answered Incorrectly

Surveys are an essential method for collecting data. But like all research methods, surveys have their limitations. Unless the survey is administered by a facilitator, a respondent has only the survey’s instructions, questions, and response options for guidance. Earlier we wrote about ways to improve the clarity of your questions and certain words to watch

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Seven Reasons People Misinterpret Survey Questions

Like in all research methods, many things can go wrong in surveys, from problems with sampling to mistakes in analysis. To draw valid conclusions from your survey, you need accurate responses. But participants may provide inaccurate information. They could forget the answers to questions or just answer questions incorrectly. One common reason respondents answer survey

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Exploring Another Alternate Form for the UMUX-Lite Usefulness Item

When thinking about user experiences with websites or software, what is the difference between capabilities and functions? Is there any difference at all? In software engineering, a function is code that takes inputs, processes them, and produces outputs (such as a math function). The word capability doesn’t have a formal definition, but it most often

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Nine Words to Watch for When Writing Survey Questions

In UX research, both studies and surveys contain a lot of questions. Getting those questions right can go a long way in improving the clarity and quality of the findings. For example, we’ve recently written about how to make survey questions clearer. And while there are many stories of how the change of a single

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Evaluating NPS Significance Tests with Real-World Data

The Net Promoter Score (NPS) is widely used by organizations. It’s often used to make high-stakes decisions on whether a brand, product, or service has improved or declined. Net Promoter Scores are often tracked on dashboards, and any changes (for better or worse) can have significant consequences: adding or removing features, redirecting budgets, even impacting

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Evaluating NPS Confidence Intervals with Real-World Data

The Net Promoter Score (NPS) is a popular business metric used to track customer loyalty. It uses a single likelihood-to-recommend (LTR) question (“How likely is it that you will recommend our company to a friend or colleague?”) with 11 scale steps from 0 (Not at all likely) to 10 (Extremely likely). In NPS terminology, respondents

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Feature Open Ended Questions 011320

Five Reasons to Use Open-Ended Questions

Despite the ease with which you can create surveys using software like our MUIQ platform, selecting specific questions and response options can be a bit more involved. Most surveys contain a mix of closed-ended (often rating scales) and open-ended questions. We’ve previously discussed 15 types of common rating scales and have published numerous articles in

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48 UX Metrics, Methods, & Measurement Articles from 2020

Happy New Year from all of us at MeasuringU! 2020 was a crazy year, but we still managed to post 48 new articles and continued improving MUIQ, our UX testing platform. We hosted our seventh UX Measurement Bootcamp, this time virtually. The change of format was a challenge, but it was fantastic to work with

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UMUX Lite easier

From Functionality to Features: Making the UMUX-Lite Even Simpler

Like pictures and pixels on a screen, words are a type of user interface. Complex language, like complex software, can lead to misunderstanding, so words should communicate effectively while being easy to understand. The solution, to paraphrase William Zinsser, is to use words that are simple and concise—a guideline that also applies to UX questionnaires.

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