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The Many Ways of Thinking Aloud

The Think Aloud method (TA) is one of the most distinguishing characteristics of usability testing. The method involves having participants speak their thoughts as they attempt tasks on an interface. We often think of the TA method as a single method, but there are substantial variations in how it’s implemented. In an earlier article, we

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UX and NPS Benchmarks of Real Estate Websites (2022)

Of the many industries impacted by the pandemic, residential real estate is certainly among the top few, along with short-term rentals, online meal/grocery delivery, hotels, and airline travel. Real estate websites offer a nearly real-time inventory of available properties for sale and rent. The popularity of these sites surged as waves of people sought to

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Should You Use Nonparametric Methods to Analyze UX Data?

Near the top of the list of concerns people have when using statistics with UX data is what to do with non-normal data. If you remember only a few things from statistics class, you might recall something about data needing to look like the infamous bell curve; more specifically, it needs to be normally distributed.

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User Experience Salaries & Calculator (2022)

Every couple of years (or so) we assist our friends at the UXPA in helping the UX community understand the latest compensation, skills, and composition of the UX profession. The UXPA salary survey didn’t go out in 2020 because of the impacts of the pandemic, but we’re happy to have a new set of data

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A Guide to Study-Based UX Metrics

For quantifying the user experience of a product, app, or experience, we recommend using a mix of study-level and task-based UX metrics. In an earlier article, we provided a comprehensive guide to task-based metrics. Tasks can be included as part of usability tests or UX benchmark studies. They involve having a representative set of users

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UX and NPS Benchmarks of News Websites (2022)

The pandemic had sudden and significant impacts on many industries, including grocery delivery, online meeting software, and vacation rentals. Understandably, people significantly increased their visits to news websites to understand the impacts of the virus and governments’ responses to it. Fake news and misinformation; fact-checkers who need fact-checkers: it’s become challenging to disentangle the biases

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Is UX Data Normally Distributed?

If you took an intro to stats class (or if you know just enough to be dangerous), you probably recall two things: something about Mark Twain’s “lies, damned lies …,” and that your data needs to be normally distributed. Turns out both are only partly true. Mark Twain did write the famous quote, but he

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A Guide to Task-Based UX Metrics

When quantifying the user experience of a product, app, or experience, we recommend using a mix of study-level and task-based UX metrics. While it’s not always feasible to assess a task experience (because of challenges with budgets, timelines, or access to products and users), observing participants attempt tasks can help uncover usability problems, informing designers

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Difficult–Easy or Easy–Difficult
—Does It Matter?

The seven-point Single Ease Question (SEQ®) has become a standard in assessing post-task perceptions of ease. We developed the SEQ over a decade ago after our research showed it performed comparably to or better than other single-item measures. It is an extension of an earlier five-point version that Tedesco and Tullis (2006 [PDF]) found performed best

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Sample Sizes for Comparing SUS Scores

Microsoft Word is a widely used word processing program, part of the Microsoft Office suite of programs. While its dominance has been challenged recently by Google Docs, Word still leads on the features list, providing many features that Google’s offering lacks. But adding features can also add to bloat, making common tasks harder as users

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A New Statistical Approach for Predicting Usability Problems

In an earlier article, we described the most common methods for modeling the total number of unique usability problems uncovered in a usability test: the average problem occurrence (p), adjusted problem occurrence (adj-p), beta-binomial, and specific problem probabilities. While these methods provide reasonably accurate predictions of the total number of unique problems, there is still

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