For Statistical Significance, Must p Be < .05?

If you know even just a little about statistics, you know that the value .05 is special. When the p-value obtained from conducting a statistical test falls below .05, it typically gets a special designation we call statistically significant. This is the conventional threshold for publishing findings in academic journals, and consequently, it is ascribed

Read More »

From Statistical to Practical Significance

Hypothesis testing is one of the most common frameworks for making decisions with data in both scientific and industrial contexts. But this statistical framework, formally called Null Hypothesis Statistics Testing (NHST), can be confusing (and controversial). In an earlier article, we showed how to use the core framework of statistical hypothesis testing: you start with

Read More »

Statistical Hypothesis Testing: What Can Go Wrong?

Making decisions with data inevitably means working with statistics and one of its most common frameworks: Null Hypothesis Significance Testing (NHST). Hypothesis testing can be confusing (and controversial), so in an earlier article we introduced the core framework of statistical hypothesis testing in four steps: Define the null hypothesis (H0). This is the hypothesis that

Read More »

How Does Statistical Hypothesis Testing Work?

Statistically significant. p-value. Hypothesis. These terms are not only commonly used in statistics but also have made their way into the vernacular. Making sense of most scientific publications, which can have practical, significant effects on public policy and your life, means understanding a core framework with which we derive much knowledge. That framework is called

Read More »
0
    0
    Your Cart
    Your cart is emptyReturn to Shop
    Scroll to Top