Evaluation of Three SEQ Variants

The Single Ease Question (SEQ®) is a single seven-point item that measures the perceived ease of task completion. It is commonly used in usability testing. Since its introduction in 2009 [PDF], some researchers have made variations in its design. Figure 1 shows the version that we currently use. In 2022, we decided to test some

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Does Changing the Number of Response Options Affect Rating Behavior?

Changing the number of response options in the survey might confuse participants. Over the years, we’ve heard variations on this concern articulated a number of different ways by clients and fellow researchers. Surveys and unmoderated UX studies commonly contain a mix of five-, seven-, and eleven-point scales. That leads some to express concern. Why are

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Should You Use Nonparametric Methods to Analyze UX Data?

Near the top of the list of concerns people have when using statistics with UX data is what to do with non-normal data. If you remember only a few things from statistics class, you might recall something about data needing to look like the infamous bell curve; more specifically, it needs to be normally distributed.

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Difficult–Easy or Easy–Difficult—
Does It Matter?

The seven-point Single Ease Question (SEQ®) has become a standard in assessing post-task perceptions of ease. We developed the SEQ over a decade ago after our research showed it performed comparably to or better than other single-item measures. It is an extension of an earlier five-point version that Tedesco and Tullis (2006 [PDF]) found performed best

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Five Styles of Statistical Rhetoric

When learning statistics, you’ll encounter many formulas based on principles of probability and mathematics. But statistics isn’t just a formulaic process where you enter data and are told what to do. Statistics should guide, not dictate, decisions. In making decisions, though, there are different styles of interpreting data. Although a lot of people think statistics

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UX-Lite Usefulness Update

Can an experience be useful without meeting your needs? The UX-Lite™ is a new questionnaire that evolved from the SUS and the UMUX-Lite. It has only two items, one measuring perceived Ease and one measuring perceived Usefulness, as shown in Figure 1. Because the verbal complexity of the original Usefulness item stands in stark contrast

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Measuring Tech Savviness

What is tech savviness? While it might be hard to define, you probably know someone whom you consider tech savvy—they might even be your go-to person for solving tech issues. Or maybe you know people who aren’t tech savvy and struggle with all technology. But why should UX researchers care? The concept of tech savviness

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49 UX Metrics, Methods, and Measurement Articles from 2021

Happy New Year from all of us at MeasuringU®! In 2021 we posted 49 articles and welcomed several new clients to our UX testing platform MUIQ®, where we continue to add new features to reduce the friction in developing studies. We hosted our eighth UX Measurement Bootcamp, again as a virtual event. Going virtual still

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Sliders versus Eleven-Point Numeric Scales on Desktop and Mobile Devices

Adding more points to a scale can increase its reliability and sensitivity. But more points also take up additional screen real-estate space. Imagine twenty or a hundred points displayed on desktop or, even worse, on mobile. One recent digital alternative, allowing for nuanced ratings using the same screen real-estate as a traditional scale, is the

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Select-All-That-Apply versus Yes/No Forced Choice Items

Do you have a Netflix subscription? Do you have a Hulu subscription? Which of the following services do you have a subscription to? Netflix Hulu Disney+ Peacock HBO Max Will you get a different percent of Netflix or Hulu selections if you ask the first form of the question compared to the second one? If

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