The UMUX-Lite Usefulness Item: Assessing a “Useful” Alternate

When Kraig Finstad (2010) developed the Usability Metric for User Experience (UMUX), his goal was to replace the ten-item System Usability Scale (SUS, a popular measure of perceived usability) with a shorter questionnaire that would (1) correlate highly with the SUS and (2) have item content related to the ISO 9241 Part 11 international standard,

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“Does What I Need It to Do”: Assessing an Alternate Usefulness Item

The UMUX-Lite is a two-item standardized questionnaire that, since its publication in 2013, has been adopted more and more by researchers who need a concise UX metric. Figure 1 shows the standard version with its Perceived Ease-of-Use (“{Product} is easy to use”) and Perceived Usefulness (“{Product}’s capabilities meet my requirements”) items.   Figure 1: Standard

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Seven Reasons Survey Questions Are Answered Incorrectly

Surveys are an essential method for collecting data. But like all research methods, surveys have their limitations. Unless the survey is administered by a facilitator, a respondent has only the survey’s instructions, questions, and response options for guidance. Earlier we wrote about ways to improve the clarity of your questions and certain words to watch

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Exploring Another Alternate Form for the UMUX-Lite Usefulness Item

When thinking about user experiences with websites or software, what is the difference between capabilities and functions? Is there any difference at all? In software engineering, a function is code that takes inputs, processes them, and produces outputs (such as a math function). The word capability doesn’t have a formal definition, but it most often

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Four Reasons Why Research Participants Forget

Post-mortems and retrospective accounts are valuable for understanding what went well and what went poorly. This applies not only to investigations of critical events, such as crimes and plane accidents, but also to experiences with products and services. But the usefulness of people’s recollections of events and experiences rests on the accuracy of their memories.

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Seven Ways to Make Survey Questions Clearer

The first questionnaires appeared in the mid–18th century (e.g., the “Milles” questionnaire). Scientific surveys have been around for almost a hundred years. Consequently, there are many sources of advice on how to make surveys better. The heart of each survey is the questions asked of respondents. Writing good survey questions involves many of the principles

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48 UX Metrics, Methods, & Measurement Articles from 2020

Happy New Year from all of us at MeasuringU! 2020 was a crazy year, but we still managed to post 48 new articles and continued improving MUIQ, our UX testing platform. We hosted our seventh UX Measurement Bootcamp, this time virtually. The change of format was a challenge, but it was fantastic to work with

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UMUX Lite easier

From Functionality to Features: Making the UMUX-Lite Even Simpler

Like pictures and pixels on a screen, words are a type of user interface. Complex language, like complex software, can lead to misunderstanding, so words should communicate effectively while being easy to understand. The solution, to paraphrase William Zinsser, is to use words that are simple and concise—a guideline that also applies to UX questionnaires.

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Randomization

What a Randomization Test Is and How to Run One in R

The two-sample t-test is one of the most widely used statistical tests, assessing whether mean differences between two samples are statistically significant. It can be used to compare two samples of many UX metrics, such as SUS scores, SEQ scores, and task times. The t-test, like most statistical tests, has certain requirements (assumptions) for its

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Change Verbs

From Soared to Plummeted: Can We Quantify Change Verbs?

Cases spike, home prices surge, and stock prices tank: we read headlines like these daily. But what is a spike and how much is a surge? When does something crater versus tank or just fall? Headlines are meant to grab our attention. They often communicate the dramatic story the author wants to tell rather than

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