Measuring UX: From the UMUX-Lite to the UX-Lite

For the past few years, we’ve written extensively about our research and usage of the UMUX-Lite. That research has followed the increase in popularity of this compact questionnaire. From its initial publication in 2013, the UMUX-Lite (Usability Metric for User Experience—Lite Version) has become an increasingly popular measure of perceived usability. Figure 1 shows the

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A Review of Alternates for the UMUX-Lite Usefulness Item

The UMUX-Lite is a popular two-item measure of perceived usability that combines perceived ratings of Ease and Usefulness, as shown in Figure 1.     Figure 1: Standard version of the UMUX-Lite (standard item wording with five-point scales). Since we began regularly using the UMUX-Lite in our practice, we’ve had numerous clients ask whether it

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UX and Net Promoter Benchmarks of Drugstore Websites

Drugstores seem to be on every city corner. They are a blend of convenience store, retailer, and pharmacy. Drugstores are a type of mass merchant enterprise, but they fit in a smaller box than their big-box counterparts. According to Kentley Insights, the total 2020 drugstore revenue in the United States was $312.1 billion. Additionally, e-commerce

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Replicating Assessments of Two UMUX-Lite Usefulness Alternates

The original wording of the UMUX-Lite Perceived Usefulness item is “{Product}’s capabilities meet my requirements.” Since we started using the UMUX-Lite in our practice, we’ve had numerous clients ask whether it would be possible to simplify the wording of this item to more closely match the simplicity of the UMUX-Lite Perceived Ease item, “{Product} is

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UX and Net Promoter Benchmarks of Mass Merchant Websites

With the COVID-19 pandemic’s effect on consumer shopping behavior (e.g., increased online shopping for delivery or contactless pickup), mass merchant revenues rose dramatically in 2020 and the first part of 2021. For example, Target reported a $15B sales growth in 2020, higher than its total sales growth over the past 11 years. For another example,

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The UMUX-Lite Usefulness Item: Assessing a “Useful” Alternate

When Kraig Finstad (2010) developed the Usability Metric for User Experience (UMUX), his goal was to replace the ten-item System Usability Scale (SUS, a popular measure of perceived usability) with a shorter questionnaire that would (1) correlate highly with the SUS and (2) have item content related to the ISO 9241 Part 11 international standard,

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“Does What I Need It to Do”: Assessing an Alternate Usefulness Item

The UMUX-Lite is a two-item standardized questionnaire that, since its publication in 2013, has been adopted more and more by researchers who need a concise UX metric. Figure 1 shows the standard version with its Perceived Ease-of-Use (“{Product} is easy to use”) and Perceived Usefulness (“{Product}’s capabilities meet my requirements”) items.   Figure 1: Standard

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Exploring Another Alternate Form for the UMUX-Lite Usefulness Item

When thinking about user experiences with websites or software, what is the difference between capabilities and functions? Is there any difference at all? In software engineering, a function is code that takes inputs, processes them, and produces outputs (such as a math function). The word capability doesn’t have a formal definition, but it most often

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48 UX Metrics, Methods, & Measurement Articles from 2020

Happy New Year from all of us at MeasuringU! 2020 was a crazy year, but we still managed to post 48 new articles and continued improving MUIQ, our UX testing platform. We hosted our seventh UX Measurement Bootcamp, this time virtually. The change of format was a challenge, but it was fantastic to work with

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UMUX Lite easier

From Functionality to Features: Making the UMUX-Lite Even Simpler

Like pictures and pixels on a screen, words are a type of user interface. Complex language, like complex software, can lead to misunderstanding, so words should communicate effectively while being easy to understand. The solution, to paraphrase William Zinsser, is to use words that are simple and concise—a guideline that also applies to UX questionnaires.

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