UX and Net Promoter Benchmarks of Auto Insurance Websites

Fifteen minutes could save you 15%. Nationwide is on your side. You’re in good hands with Allstate. Auto insurance commercials are ubiquitous. It’s no wonder, considering the market. In 2020, the population of the United States was 331,000,000, and 230,000,000 Americans were licensed drivers. If you drive, you should have auto insurance. Until recently, most

Read More »
Randomization

What a Randomization Test Is and How to Run One in R

The two-sample t-test is one of the most widely used statistical tests, assessing whether mean differences between two samples are statistically significant. It can be used to compare two samples of many UX metrics, such as SUS scores, SEQ scores, and task times. The t-test, like most statistical tests, has certain requirements (assumptions) for its

Read More »
Change Verbs

From Soared to Plummeted: Can We Quantify Change Verbs?

Cases spike, home prices surge, and stock prices tank: we read headlines like these daily. But what is a spike and how much is a surge? When does something crater versus tank or just fall? Headlines are meant to grab our attention. They often communicate the dramatic story the author wants to tell rather than

Read More »

Latin and Greco-Latin Experimental Designs for UX Research

During the fall in the northern hemisphere, leaves change colors, birds fly south, and the temperature gets colder. Do the birds change the color of the leaves, and does their departure make the temperature colder? What if you gave participants two versions of a rating scale, with the first having responses ordered from strongly disagree

Read More »

The UX of Vacation Rental Websites

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to significant changes in how people have vacationed in 2020. To get away from it all without spending time in crowded places, vacationers have turned to vacation rental websites and have planned longer stays. For example, Airbnb recently reported a year-to-year doubling of long-term (>28 days) rentals and a shift

Read More »

Simplifying the UMUX-Lite

It seems like every few years a new standardized UX measure comes along. Standardization of UX measurement is a good thing for researchers and practitioners. Having common methods and definitions helps with objectivity, generalization, economy, and professional communication. At MeasuringU, we pay a lot of attention to the continuing evolution of standardized UX measurement. The

Read More »

Are Within-Subjects Designs Invalid?

One of the best ways to make UX metrics more meaningful is to have a comparison. For example, when conducting a UX benchmark study we often recommend adding at least one competing product (especially if it’s the first benchmark). Comparable interfaces help stakeholders easily interpret context-sensitive task metrics, such as completion rates and task time.

Read More »

How to Convert Between Five- and Seven-Point Scales

There is plenty of debate about the best way to quantify attitudes and experiences with rating scales. And among those debates, perhaps the most popular question is the “right” number of response options to use for rating scales. For example, is an eleven-point scale too difficult for people to understand? Is a three-point scale insufficient

Read More »

Leading Vs. Lagging Measures in UX

Driving down the road while only looking in the rearview mirror … that gives you a good idea of where you’ve been, but unless the road behind you is exactly like the one in front of you, you may run into some obstacles, to put it mildly. Safe and effective driving means looking forward and

Read More »
0
    0
    Your Cart
    Your cart is emptyReturn to Shop
    Scroll to Top