The Many Ways of Thinking Aloud

The Think Aloud method (TA) is one of the most distinguishing characteristics of usability testing. The method involves having participants speak their thoughts as they attempt tasks on an interface. We often think of the TA method as a single method, but there are substantial variations in how it’s implemented. In an earlier article, we

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Difficult–Easy or Easy–Difficult—
Does It Matter?

The seven-point Single Ease Question (SEQ®) has become a standard in assessing post-task perceptions of ease. We developed the SEQ over a decade ago after our research showed it performed comparably to or better than other single-item measures. It is an extension of an earlier five-point version that Tedesco and Tullis (2006 [PDF]) found performed best

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How to Report Product Experience Data

How often do you use your phone? How about a streaming service you subscribe to, like Hulu or Netflix? What about software, like Microsoft Excel? In an earlier article, we discussed the importance of measuring prior experience. Prior experience is a strong predictor of UX metrics. People who are familiar with a product and use

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UX-Lite Usefulness Update

Can an experience be useful without meeting your needs? The UX-Lite™ is a new questionnaire that evolved from the SUS and the UMUX-Lite. It has only two items, one measuring perceived Ease and one measuring perceived Usefulness, as shown in Figure 1. Because the verbal complexity of the original Usefulness item stands in stark contrast

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Measuring Tech Savviness

What is tech savviness? While it might be hard to define, you probably know someone whom you consider tech savvy—they might even be your go-to person for solving tech issues. Or maybe you know people who aren’t tech savvy and struggle with all technology. But why should UX researchers care? The concept of tech savviness

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Sample Sizes for a SUS Score

Despite its age and the availability of other UX measures such as the UX-Lite™ and SUPR-Q®, the ten-item System Usability Scale (SUS) is still a very popular measure. It’s used widely in benchmark tests of software products to generate an overall score of perceived usability. We regularly collect SUS scores for dozens of consumer and

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Select-All-That-Apply versus Yes/No Forced Choice Items

Do you have a Netflix subscription? Do you have a Hulu subscription? Which of the following services do you have a subscription to? Netflix Hulu Disney+ Peacock HBO Max Will you get a different percent of Netflix or Hulu selections if you ask the first form of the question compared to the second one? If

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Censuses, Polls, Surveys, and Questionnaires:
How Are They Different?

Surveys are one of the most popular methods in applied research. While many have argued that surveys are overused, it’s hard to believe that surveys have no place in multi-method UX research. When conducting survey-based research, you’ll often encounter the terms census, poll, and questionnaire used in conjunction with—and often interchangeably with—the term survey. But

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Measuring UX: From the UMUX-Lite to the UX-Lite

For the past few years, we’ve written extensively about our research and usage of the UMUX-Lite. That research has followed the increase in popularity of this compact questionnaire. From its initial publication in 2013, the UMUX-Lite (Usability Metric for User Experience—Lite Version) has become an increasingly popular measure of perceived usability. Figure 1 shows the

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