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The UMUX-Lite Usefulness Item: Assessing a “Useful” Alternate

When Kraig Finstad (2010) developed the Usability Metric for User Experience (UMUX), his goal was to replace the ten-item System Usability Scale (SUS, a popular measure of perceived usability) with a shorter questionnaire that would (1) correlate highly with the SUS and (2) have item content related to the ISO 9241 Part 11 international standard,

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Sample Sizes for Comparing Net Promoter Scores

Sample size estimation is a critical step in research planning, including when you’re trying to detect differences in measures like Net Promoter Scores. Too small of a sample and you risk not being able to differentiate real differences from sampling error. Too large of a sample and you risk wasting resources—researchers’ and respondents’ time and,

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From Statistical to Practical Significance

Hypothesis testing is one of the most common frameworks for making decisions with data in both scientific and industrial contexts. But this statistical framework, formally called Null Hypothesis Statistics Testing (NHST), can be confusing (and controversial). In an earlier article, we showed how to use the core framework of statistical hypothesis testing: you start with

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The Anatomy of a Survey Question

We’ve written extensively about question types, the elements of good and bad writing, why people forget, and common problems with survey questions. But how do you get started writing questions? Few professionals we know have taken a formal course in survey development and instead rely on their experiences or best practices. Despite being called questions,

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“Does What I Need It to Do”: Assessing an Alternate Usefulness Item

The UMUX-Lite is a two-item standardized questionnaire that, since its publication in 2013, has been adopted more and more by researchers who need a concise UX metric. Figure 1 shows the standard version with its Perceived Ease-of-Use (“{Product} is easy to use”) and Perceived Usefulness (“{Product}’s capabilities meet my requirements”) items.   Figure 1: Standard

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A Decision Tree for Picking the Right Type of Survey Question

Crafting survey questions involves thinking first about the content and then about the format (form follows function). Earlier, we categorized survey questions into four content types (attribute, behavior, ability, or sentiment) and four format classes (open-ended, closed-ended static, closed-ended dynamic, or task-based). As with any taxonomy, there are several ways to categorize response options (e.g.,

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Statistical Hypothesis Testing: What Can Go Wrong?

Making decisions with data inevitably means working with statistics and one of its most common frameworks: Null Hypothesis Significance Testing (NHST). Hypothesis testing can be confusing (and controversial), so in an earlier article we introduced the core framework of statistical hypothesis testing in four steps: Define the null hypothesis (H0). This is the hypothesis that

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Classifying Survey Questions into Four Content Types

In architecture, form follows function. In survey design, question format follows content. Earlier we described four classes of survey questions. These four classes are about the form, or format, of the question (e.g., open- vs. closed-ended). But before you can decide effectively on the format, you need to choose the content of the question and

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Do Too Many Response Options Confuse People?

Advice on rating scale construction is ubiquitous on the internet and in the halls of organizations worldwide. The problem is that much of the advice is based not on solid data but rather on conventional wisdom and what’s merely thought to work. Even published papers and books on survey design can present a perspective that

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Four Types of Potential Survey Errors

When we conduct a survey, we want the truth, even if we can’t handle it. But standing in the way of our dreams of efficiently collected data revealing the unvarnished truth about customers, prospects, and users are the four horsemen of survey errors. Even a well-thought-out survey will have to deal with the inevitable challenge

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How Does Statistical Hypothesis Testing Work?

Statistically significant. p-value. Hypothesis. These terms are not only commonly used in statistics but also have made their way into the vernacular. Making sense of most scientific publications, which can have practical, significant effects on public policy and your life, means understanding a core framework with which we derive much knowledge. That framework is called

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Quant or Qual Research? 27 Words to Help You Decide

When approaching a UX research project, one of the first things to consider is the method. And UX research has many methods. Methods can be categorized as quantitatively focused (e.g., A/B tests) or qualitatively focused (e.g., interviews). Most UX research methods can collect both qualitative and quantitative data. For example, surveys often collect both closed-ended

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